The Timeless One

The Timeless One

Lord, you have been our dwelling place in all generations. Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever you had formed the earth and the world, from everlasting to everlasting you are God. You turn us back to dust, and say, “Turn back, you mortals.” For a thousand years in your sight are like yesterday when it is past, or like a watch in the night. Psalm 90:1-4

I had a revealing dream several years after my father’s death. He died suddenly, early on a  December morning, when I was 14. In the years that followed, a series of dreams haunted me where I knew he was present, but just out of sight. I would run to where he was, but by the time I got there, he would be gone. The revealing dream was this: My sister and I were looking out the front window of our home when I saw dad park the car and get out with a bag of groceries – and then I woke up (in more ways than one). The dream told me that one day, the years without my father will seem no more significant than the time apart from a trip to the grocery store. The reason this is true is that our experience of the passage of time is but a moment in the context of eternity.

Psalm 90 equates a thousand years to yesterday. Likewise, 2 Peter 3:8 tells us: “…with the Lord one day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like one day.” God time is not the same as human time. Here is a way we can perhaps visualize how this is possible. If we were two-dimensional beings – experiencing life only through height and width – we could only experience the third dimension (depth) in time. In other words, in any given moment we could see above and below, side to side, but not front or back. We would only be able to experience moving forward or backward in the passage of time. To us now, as three-dimensional beings, it is clear what lies immediately ahead for our two-dimensional friends because we can perceive all three dimensions at once. As the theory goes, we experience the next dimension beyond our physical reality in time. The question is this: What is the nature of the fourth dimension that we can only experience in time? When freed of our three-dimensionality, what expanded reality will be revealed to us, in the same way that depth appears to a two-dimensional being? I believe this is at the heart of our quandary, that our earth-bound perception is limited to three-dimensionality, and the mysterious reality beyond our experience unfolds for us in time.

The creation story in Genesis records that God created the earth and everything in it in six days. Some Christians believe creation occurred in 6 twenty-four hour periods, probably less than 10,000 years ago. Many scientists believe the creation occurred with a Big Bang about 13.8 billion years ago. For me, the question of which time frame is correct is irrelevant and unanswerable because time for the creator – the Timeless One – is inconceivable to us.

Albert Einstein proved, mathematically, that time is relative and not absolute. In other words, time is not a precise measurement that exists independent of our observation of it. In fact, in his later years, Einstein concluded that past, present, and future exist simultaneously in the fourth dimension, which he labeled as time-space. The point is this: Time, as we experience it, is only accurate in a limited way and for a limited cross-section of reality. When we are freed from the limitations of the earth-bound portion of our lives, the spans of decades, centuries, and eons will seem no longer than a trip to the grocery store.

All of this is to say that there is both biblical and scientific evidence that time is not as we believe, nor is the world we experience the entirety of everything created. Our lives are one part of an eternal creation that stretches from before our birth to beyond our physical death, when we will rejoin the Timeless One in an existence beyond earth-time.

Note: this is the sixteenth in a series of Life Notes on the Faces of God

4 thoughts on “The Timeless One

  1. Thank you so much, Greg. This post I’m saving for my nephew who was 14 y/o when his dad died of drug addiction this past February. I discovered your blog when I was writing up my brother’s eulogy that I gave, and used an excerpt of your passage about the grain of wheat that falls will become multitudes. I wrote to you, and your words were balm to my heart.
    Reading your blog keeps me grounded on the essentials of my faith and to live and breath in my everyday life.
    Your faithful reader in Paris, France.
    Merci!
    Aimée

    Like

    1. Hi Aimee,
      It is such a blessing to hear from you and know that something I wrote (actually, that God wrote through me) has touched your life and those around you in a meaningful way. I am humbled.
      Take care of yourself, my sister in the Spirit!
      Greg

      Like

  2. Interesting. Your thoughts on two-dimensional beings reminds me of this – and makes me consider you’ve probably seen it – http://www.doesgodexist.org/Pamphlets/Flatland.html.

    AND…more importantly, the thoughts on the irrelevance of the age of the earth are going to push me into some more thinking. I’ve been a firm “young earth creationist” for a long time. Hmm….considering that it’s irrelevant is going to take some time for me to absorb. But I like the idea.

    Like

    1. Hi Joe, I had not seen the article, but it is interesting — Flatland, hmmm! I first tried to explain this concept using a plane through the fingers of my hand. A 2-dimensional being would see 5 circles and have no concept that the 5 circles are intimately connected with each other in the 3rd dimension.
      I was probably a little flippant with the term “irrelevant,” when referring to the age of the earth. What I meant was that it is a question that cannot be answered or understood from our 3-dimensionality, so why trouble ourselves with it? Certainly, I would never say God is not capable of a 6 day creation (in human time). But I think a reasonable and spiritual person can also believe God created an evolving, ever-changing world that continues to form billions of years later. Both narratives are awe-inspiring to me, and I do not believe the awesomeness of God is lessened by either belief. Now the narrative of a Big Bang and all of life proceeding randomly from an unlikely series of chance encounters — that requires a strength of faith I do not possess…

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s